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Smartphone App to Navigate Public Transport for Persons with Down Syndrome

Smartphone App to Navigate Public Transport for Persons with Down Syndrome
Smartphone App to Navigate Public Transport for Persons with Down Syndrome

Smartphone App to Navigate Public Transport for Persons with Down Syndrome

Updated: 27 December 2020

SINGAPORE 2020

Persons with down syndrome are often challenged by the complexities of navigating our urban city from point A to B. From changing buses to winding streets, it can be daunting to travel alone.

A team of students from NUS High School of Math and Science worked with feedback from Down Syndrome Association to create an application that would relieve the distress and angst faced when travelling alone.

A simplified user interface and experience display instructions in a clear manner that is simple to understand with one glance. Coupled with audio narration for:

  1. names of bus stops, public train stations and landmarks;
  2. walking directions to the bus stop/train station in real-time;
  3. remaining stations/stops on the journey to the chosen destination. 

The experience is almost like travelling with a human companion, even having a button to answer “Where am I now?” to alleviate the stress of uncertainty from the user.

With expert feedback, the students have far-reaching possibilities to develop the easy-to-navigate app to aid a wider audience, such as the visually impaired, less tech-savvy elderly and young children learning to take transport. 

Wait, what were we doing when we were 17, again?

This project is part of our Go Digital ASEAN, a Tech For Good Innovation Challenge, in partnership with The Asia Foundation, with support from Google.org. 

Follow us for updates, as the students navigate through app development in the coming months!

#GoDigitalASEAN #ASEAN, #digitalskills, #digitalliteracy, #digitaleconomy
#techforgoodsg2020 #techforgoodsg #engineeringgood #digitaldivide 

Optional hashtags for additional traction

The Asia Foundation handles
Twitter: @asia_foundation
Facebook: @theasiafoundation
Instagram: @theasiafoundation
LinkedIn: @The Asia Foundation

Computer Startup Menu Navigator for the Visually Impaired

Computer Startup Menu Navigator for the Visually Impaired

Computer Startup Menu Navigator for the Visually Impaired

SINGAPORE 2020

How many of us actually read the screens and text that appear before our computer actually starts up? Okay, we know the geeks among us, have their hands up. But what if a person who is visually impaired wanted to know this information? (Or be one of us?) He or she will not be able to run a screen reader programme until their computer actually starts up.

How about using the camera on your phone to read the screen? That’s what the student team from Tampines-Meridian Junior College created. They developed a camera feature that detects a computer screen and records the data on the screen. Finally, it runs through a classification feature to identify what is shown on the screen. Visually impaired users can then get more acquainted with their computers.

This project is part of our Go Digital ASEAN, a Tech For Good Innovation Challenge, in partnership with The Asia Foundation, with support from Google.org. The problem statement and insights were supported by SG Enable.

Look into the future, follow us and see more updates on their project on your social media channels!

#GoDigitalASEAN #ASEAN, #digitalskills, #digitalliteracy, #digitaleconomy
#techforgoodsg2020 #techforgoodsg #engineeringgood #digitaldivide

Optional hashtags for additional traction

The Asia Foundation handles
Twitter: @asia_foundation
Facebook: @theasiafoundation
Instagram: @theasiafoundation
LinkedIn: @The Asia Foundation

Notification Alerts for the Hearing Impaired

Notification Alerts for the Hearing Impaired

Notification Alerts for the Hearing Impaired

SINGAPORE 2020

You’ll be surprised how many sounds take us through our daily lives. From hearing our alarm clock ring, to the microwave beeps, to the kettle whistling to even a weak knock on the door, traffic and honking - all these sounds give us awareness of our environment. Some sounds are crucial for taking an appropriate action upon hearing a sound or a siren and seeking shelter or safety - such as fire alarms and public warning systems.

ITE College Central’s team of 5 students worked closely with a hearing-impaired youth, William, to understand how well-placed sensors can save his life, help him perform better at work or even prevent awkward social situations.

An IoT system was designed to receive signals from vibration and temperature sensors placed at different frequented and important locations in his home and workplace, e.g. alarm clocks, doors, fire alarms. The data will then be sent to cloud-based web services, such as ThingSpeak and IFTTT to analyse and trigger alerts on William’s phone and an RGB LED display.

The possibilities are endless for the user when a robust system is created. It will enable persons with hearing impairments to live independently in a safe environment.

This project is part of our Go Digital ASEAN, a Tech For Good Innovation Challenge, in partnership with The Asia Foundation, with support from Google.org.

Follow our journey to see how we transform William’s life as we further develop this solution.

#GoDigitalASEAN #ASEAN, #digitalskills, #digitalliteracy, #digitaleconomy
#techforgoodsg2020 #techforgoodsg #engineeringgood #digitaldivide

Optional hashtags for additional traction

The Asia Foundation handles
Twitter: @asia_foundation
Facebook: @theasiafoundation
Instagram: @theasiafoundation
LinkedIn: @The Asia Foundation

Face-to-Face Communication for the Hearing Impaired

Face-to-Face Communication for the Hearing Impaired

Face-to-Face Communication for the Hearing Impaired

SINGAPORE 2020

Speech-to-text apps are more like ‘speech-to-user-looking-at-phone-text-constantly’! Hearing-impaired users often miss out on the joys and social cues we get from body language and face-to-face conversations when forced into using these apps to communicate with other people.

Five National Junior College students designed an app that converts speech-to-text on smart glasses. That’s right, subtitles for real life! Hearing-impaired users can now engage with other people with their eyes and participate in conversations fully, with the smiles and expressions of their hearing companions.

The students foresee a wide application for such technology, even for the hearing. It could mean real-time translations for 2 people conversing in different languages. Annyeonghaseyo!

This project is part of our Go Digital ASEAN, a Tech For Good Innovation Challenge, in partnership with The Asia Foundation, with support from Google.org. The problem statement and insights were supported by SG Enable.

Can you see the amazing potential here? Follow us to watch the students progress!

#GoDigitalASEAN #ASEAN, #digitalskills, #digitalliteracy, #digitaleconomy
#techforgoodsg2020 #techforgoodsg #engineeringgood #digitaldivide

Optional hashtags for additional traction

The Asia Foundation handles
Twitter: @asia_foundation
Facebook: @theasiafoundation
Instagram: @theasiafoundation
LinkedIn: @The Asia Foundation

One Good DEED

One Good DEED

Top Row (L to R): Amanda, Jensen, John, Jia Jun, Hui Kang.
Bottom Row (L to R): Yu Lian, Yun Xuan

Updated: 29 November 2020

Led by a team of students looking to impact society in a meaningful way, Project Good DEED was started and centred around skills-based volunteerism. Recognising that most products and services in the world are not designed with disabilities in mind, the vision for the project was to Design, Engage and Engineer for Disabilities, thereby forming the acronym “DEED”.

This project is no ordinary service-learning project. Instead, it is centered around skills-based volunteerism, for the team wanted to utilise their specialised knowledge in engineering to build something that could ameliorate the daily challenges faced by people with cerebral palsy. At the same time, they had also hoped to leverage their business expertise to have the general populace be more empathetic towards those around them. With these two goals in mind, the team curated an experiential journey with the aim of cultivating empathy for Engineering Good’s workshop participants.

This journey involves three phases, where workshop participants will first understand more about the cerebral palsy condition, before experiencing first hand, the daily challenges faced by people with cerebral palsy, and finally taking action to build an assistive device for them. Through the process of understanding, experiencing and taking actions, the team hopes that their efforts will encourage people to be more empathetic and touch the lives of the beneficiaries at the same time.